Segment Teaching Kick vs. Pull Techniques in Pin and Pull Schemes

Feb 22, 2021 | Offense, Run Game, Pin and Pull Run Concepts

By Hussam Ouri
Offensive Line Coach and Football S&C Coordinator
Shepherd University (WV)
Twitter: @CoachHussamOuri

 

One of the most overlooked aspects of coaching the Pin and Pull scheme is the coaching of the individual blocks. Both the Pin aspect of the play and the Pull. At Shepherd University, we as coaches do our best to put our players in a position to be successful. That is accomplished by providing the players with multiple tools (not every tool has to be used on every play) and teaching them when those tools are necessary. These tools and the knowledge of when to use them are sharpened through proper drill work and consistent reinforcement.

The first diagram will explain our base teaching of Pin and Pull.

Ouri Diagram 1

 

Install Rules:

Front/Play side TE: If the play side tackle is covered, down block. If the play side tackle is uncovered, drive block 1st defender that is head up to outside. You are responsible for setting the edge. If the defender crosses your face, drive him to the angle that you capture him.

Front / Play side Tackle: If the play side guard is covered, down block. If the play side guard is uncovered, mirror pull to the force defender.

  • If you’re the first puller out, get outside of the pin
  • This helps us maintain proper leverage on the force defender
  • Do not let an opposite color jersey cross your face (pressure or missed blocks)

 

Front / Play side Guard: If the Center is covered, down block. If the Center is uncovered, mirror pull to the force defender.

  • If you’re the first puller out, get outside of the pin
  • This helps us maintain proper leverage on the force defender
  • Do not let an opposite color jersey cross your face (pressure or missed blocks)

 

Center: Mirror pull to the first linebacker in the box to the play side.

  • You will be the 2nd puller out which means you have to read the down block of the TE
  • If the down block of the TE is effective, get around the block. If the down block is forced to expand, cut it up and insert it inside of the down block
  • In-game adjustments can be made if the Center is unable to pull or if the backside nose is getting upfield too quick (Pin and Pull now becomes true Buck Sweep)
  • Do not let an opposite color jersey cross your face (pressure or missed blocks)

 

Backside Guard: Zone scoop the backside A gap defender VS an even front. Mirror pull to the 2nd linebacker in the box to the play side VS an ODD front.

  • If pulling, make sure to get proper depth so you don’t get picked off

 

Backside Tackle:  Zone scoop the backside B gap using a 2 for 1 technique or mirror pull for the Mike linebacker if you have a TE or FB on the backside that can cut off the DE.

  • The 2 for 1 technique is used to create a wall on the backside DE (the speed of the defender dictates how long we stay on the block). Once the backside edge is secured, take a proper angle of departure to the backside linebacker (his play side armpit)
  • The backside tackle pull can only happen with a TE or FB attached to the backside so that we can properly secure the backside edge and gain leverage on the backside linebacker (this is communicated by the BST and backside TE)
  • Backside TE (12 Personnel): Zone scoop the C gap
    • Communicate with the BST about a potential pull

 

Coaching Points:

The down block “PIN”: The down block is one of the oldest and most used blocks in football, but it does not mean that we as coaches can assume that the players know exactly what to do so we provide them with these coaching points. The first step taken on a down block should be a flat angle step to the defender's near neck V. This step must be intentional and serve a purpose. That purpose is to STOP upfield penetration. We tell our guys that the wider the defender, the flatter the step needs to be to STOP the up-field rush. This block must happen from the ground up so that the OL is not lunging at the defender with our upper body.

The second step taken is a vertical angle step (upfield and towards the defender) to the defenders near foot/hip.  The purpose of this step is to keep the defender "pinned" and do not allow the defender to cross face. This step is used only once the up-field penetration is STOPPED with the first step. Our players must know not to step up the field on their first step to not allow any penetration. Once the first and second steps have been taken, we then coach our players to lockout their up-field arm (if you're down blocking someone to your right, it would be your left arm). This lockout process allows us to apply more pressure on the defender's outside breastplate and assists us with maintaining proper down block angles and leverage.

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