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By Jason Brown, Defensive Coordinator, Dutchtown High School (LA)


Jet motion is becoming more and more prevalent within offensive schemes today. This concept presents a multitude of problems that are not solved by the typical motion adjustments most defenses employ in their basic defensive schemes. Find out how Coach Brown keeps the offense guessing with his 8 different looks...

 



By Jason Brown
Defensive Coordinator
Dutchtown High School (LA)

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Introduction:

Jet motion is becoming more and more prevalent within offensive schemes today. This concept presents a multitude of problems that are not solved by the typical motion adjustments most defenses employ in their basic defensive schemes. We feel that it is important to have multiple ways to defend an offensive attack. Our rationale is simple: if an offense can determine how you adjust, they can force that adjustment and exploit its inherent weaknesses. We believe that it is important to move the stress points around in your defense so the offense cannot determine where to attack.

At Dutchtown High, we know we don’t have all the answers but we do have answers in which we really believe. Furthermore, we are always looking for more and more answers to try and improve our defense. That said, It is my intention, to show you the ways that we have defended the Jet concept and hopefully stimulate thought for you to develop even more and better ways to defend this concept.

Jet Motion Problems

The Jet Motion Concept has been around for a long time within the Spread offense. Offenses are starting to build more and more plays into the concept to make it even more effective. It has a lot of similarities to Flexbone motion, and Wing T motion (End-Over formations with two backs in the backfield is a totally different animal for us that we treat differently). The problems we see with defending Jet motion are as follows:

  1. The Speed Sweep gets on the perimeter very quickly.
  2. The Trio passing game is created from the 2x2 set.
  3. Doubles passing game is created from the 3x1 set.
  4. Front side and Backside internal run plays come off the Jet action
  5. Play action exists on the Front side and Backside of the Jet motion.
  6. Vertical shots are prevalent within the Jet concept.
  7. There are a lot of similarities with the Wildcat offense if run with a good running QB.

Defending the Jet Motion

We believe the ways you pick to defend Jet Motion must have the previous points in mind. It is also important to note that you will have a tradeoff in every way that you choose to defend Jet motion. Therefore, make your choices of defensive concepts understanding each one has a weakness.

The multiple ways that we defend Jet motion are listed as follows:

  1. Bump the backers and stick with your Split Safety or MOF coverage.
  2. Rotation of the Secondary from a Split Safety look to a MOF look with the Safety or the Corner being Primary Force.
  3. Rotation of the MOF concept to a Trap side with Man on the Backside of the coverage.

What You’re Missing…

Join X&O Labs’ Insiders, an exclusive membership-based website, and you’ll get instant access to the full-length version of this report—including access to everything X&O Labs has ever published. Plus, if you join today, you’ll also receive up to 4 FREE books mailed directly to your home or office. Here’s just a small sample of what you’ll find in the full-length version of this report:

  • Coach Brown provides a rationale for all eight of his adjustments to jet motion based on how the offense is using it.
  • Coach Brown’s “ghost rule” which keeps the split safety zone structure to the side of the jet motion.
  • Coach Brown’s “Indi” coverage concept, which provides pressure to the side of the jet motion.
  • Coach Brown’s “slingshot” coverage concept, which he will use if the jet motion is going away from the called pressure.
  • Plus game film on each of these adjustments

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Conclusion:

These are the many different ways we have defended the Jet series in games and at practice. We don’t carry all of these adjustments into a game plan each week and a lot of times it depends on what your defensive personnel can do well as to which one you would choose. It is important to note that all of these examples have been tried and tested and we have learned what we like and what we don’t like about each adjustment. We have kept what we liked and refined or discarded the stuff that has gotten our butts kicked. The main goal of this report is to stimulate thought on defending a very popular concept being used today. It has been a pleasure writing for X&O Labs again, and remember in defensive football, “If your eyes are right, you are right.”

 

Meet Coach Brown: Jason Brown is the Defensive Coordinator at Dutchtown High School in Geismar, Louisiana. He has been coaching for 25 years with 21 of them serving as Defensive Coordinator at various upper classification schools in Louisiana. Dutchtown High School has a 51-11 record over the last five years and their defense has contributed greatly to this success. Some notable former players for Dutchtown High School include Eddie Lacy (RB Green Bay Packers), Eric Reid (DB San Francisco 49ers), and Landon Collins (DB Alabama).

 

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